No Plain Jane

Theatre reviews and musings (mostly) from Adelaide

Tag: Stephen Moylan

AdlFringe Review: One for the Ugly Girls

This review contains significant spoilers. 

Playwright Tahli Corin is one on a long list of Adelaide playwrights moved interstate. It is all too rare to see plays by these writers in Adelaide: second-hand reports come in from Sydney, a few will travel to see it and come back, but the reasons they leave are certainly evident. No less than three ex-South Australian playwrights have works debuting at Griffin Theatre in Sydney this year, including Corin, and it is wonderful to see ONFG giving One for the Ugly Girls its Adelaide premiere, directed here by Adriana Bonaccurso.

Alistair (Syd Brisbane) is an artist whose work hangs in the National Gallery. Suffering from a block in his work resulting from his wife’s death, he hires life model Jade (Lori Bell) for inspiration. When Jade arrives, though, she doesn’t match the picture of what he had in his head – or of the image that was posted on the website. After an initial conflict, the two settle into an antagonistic relationship: each pushing each other’s comfort and buttons, until Jade manages to show Alistair a way back into his art.

The audience soon learn that this Jade isn’t the model from the website at all, and eventually with the appearance of the real Jade (Hannah Norris), the first woman is revealed to be Claire, her step-sister. Out with the old and in with the new, as Alistair replaces the raw and contentious Claire with the shiny veneer of Jade.

There is a slight clumsiness to this turning point in the production which neither Corin nor Bonaccurso have managed to resolve. As an audience, we have been given no hints as to how much Alistair himself knew about the manipulation, nor why he was so happy to go along with it for so long. Was it a simple case of loneliness, of the simple energy that is generated their fights? But then why is he so fickle as to replace one with the other so quickly?

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Review: Alice and Peter Grow Up

Every now and then I have a moment where I realise that maybe – just maybe – I’m actually a Grown Up.  They’re few and far between; not because I see myself as a child, but because to be an adult seems all at once huge and scary and unobtainable and certainly doesn’t seem like something I will be at any time soon.  More often, I suppose, I feel like I am playing at being a Grown Up.  I’ve managed to convince people that I can have proper jobs and proper responsibilities, and it’s all a farce which is great fun.

At the entrance of Format, we are passed a questionnaire: how grown up are you? Downstairs in the slightly awkward basement, we are introduced to Subject One and Subject Two, working their way through a modulated course, giving their audience the skills they need to grow up.   Alice (Aston Malcom) has a Grown Up score of 9 out of 50.  Peter (Sebastian Freeman) has a Grown Up score of 12. The apathetic Alice and the cocky Peter must make their way through each of the sections, learning, among other things, how to have a conversation, how to date, how to be married, and how to act at work.  It’s trial by procedure rather than trial by error.

This devised theatre piece by a young team under the direction of Nescha Jelk hilariously and charmingly winds its way through the bed of uncertainty that is these years of trying (or ignoring the fate) of being an adult.  From the jokes that hit too close to the bone, to the sublimely ridiculous, Malcom and Freeman embrace the essence of struggling with your burgeoning adulthood, even if it is in a course and not in the real world. Read the rest of this entry »